Jealousy during a drunken threesome involving current and former Yale students fueled last May’s violent stabbing which ended in one man jumping out a window to his death, according to a newly released police report.

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Tyler Carlisle and Alexander Michaud, both 21, were having s*x with a female student — who has not been publicly named — when Carlisle grabbed a knife and plunged it into his long-time friend’s throat, according to the New Haven police report obtained by Gawker.

The shocking new details, obtained through Connecticut’s Freedom of Information Act, are the first to shed light on a motive behind the senseless tragedy which left Carlisle dead and Michaud suffering a critical stab wound.

Both men who were from Manchester, N.H., and members of Yale’s conservative campus group Party of the Right, according to the student-run newspaper — were in an off-campus apartment on May 26 with the female student when things turned violent.

Carlisle, who recently graduated after studying philosophy, is said to have become “jealous” of Michaud and consequently grabbed a knife off a nearby nightstand before wounding Michaud in his upper throat.

Michaud told police he next remembers finding himself sitting in the living room where the female began pressing a T-shirt to his wound.

Carlisle was meanwhile said to have been pacing back and forth, apologizing, before going to the ninth floor apartment’s window and saying he was going to jump.

Michaud said he didn’t see the recent graduate jump. His body was later recovered six stories below, on a third-floor terrace.

When police arrived they said they found the two surviving students unclad in the apartment. The woman was described as “too distraught at the time of the incident to give a statement.”

“He had a lot to live for, and it was nothing I would have expected,” a friend of Carlisle said after news of his death.

Another surprised friend, who said “you expected him to be a senator,” stressed the importance of knowing “the why and the how.”

“I think that’s part of the grieving process, is you ask why,” Emelia Attridge told the paper.

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